Christa Jaillet - LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Christa Jaillet on 2/11/2016

Baking soda is not just for baking. It has many uses in your home from removing stains to treating burns and bites. Here are some great tips for home uses of baking soda: Just one-teaspoon baking soda to one quart of warm water will clean your refrigerator. Unclog your drain with a cup of baking soda. Pour it into the opening of your drain and then add a cup of hot vinegar. Wait a few minutes, flush the drain with a quart of boiling water. Keep the pests out of your home by laying down barrier of baking soda under sink-pipe openings and along basement windows. Relieve sunburned or itchy skin by adding baking soda to your bath water. A paste of baking soda and water applied to a burn or an insect bite will provide relief. Clean your toothbrush by soaking it in baking soda and warm water overnight. A paste of baking soda and water will remove stains from your coffee and tea cups, and red sauce stains from plastic containers. Post your own baking soda tips below.





Posted by Christa Jaillet on 12/31/2015

Did you know that indoor air pollution is actually worse than outdoor air pollution? Indoor pollution can in fact be 2 to 10 times worse depending on the materials in your home. Many of the materials in your home omit Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's). According to the EPA, VOC's are in the air that you breathe and can have long term health effects, including liver, kidney and central nervous system damage and cancer. Here is a list of some of the indoor air pollutants that you may want to reduce or remove in order to have a healthier home. Cleaning Supplies The things that clean your home may be making you sick. In fact, bleach is one of the biggest offenders. In order to have a truly clean home, remove all of these chemicals and start replacing them with natural ones. Check the labels of everything. Many sheets that are made for your dryer have formaldehyde in them. Some of the most dangerous cleaning products are corrosive drain cleaners, oven cleaners, and acidic toilet bowl cleaners. Corrosive chemicals can cause severe burns on eyes, skin and, if ingested, on the throat and esophagus. Air Fresheners Air fresheners may smell sweet but their effect can be anything but. Some air fresheners can send chemicals into the air that contain VOCs. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology looked at plug-in fresheners and found more than 20 VOCs' and more than one-third were considered toxic or hazardous. VOCs can increase the risk of asthma in kids. At high enough levels, they can also irritate the eyes and lungs, trigger dizziness and headaches, and even lead to memory loss. Furniture Believe it or not the place where you sit or sleep could be harming your health. Furniture is such a big part of our life, we eat on it, sleep and sit on it. Furniture also can emit VOCs. Furniture is often made with flame retardants, finishes, adhesives and foam cushions that give off harmful chemicals. Paint You often hear about the dangers of lead paint. You should also be worried about the brand new fresh paint you just put on the walls. Paint, paint strippers, varnish removers and floor stains all emit VOC's into the air. These chemicals don't go away once the paint has dried or once it stops smelling. The harmful chemicals can last for as long as two years. New Flooring That new carpet smell is not good for you. As pretty as it may look new carpet, wood floors or even linoleum flooring give off VOCs. Purchase flooring produced from renewable materials such as linseed oil, rosins, wood flour and jute. Look for wood flooring that is FSC Certified (it came from a Forest Stewardship Council Certified Forest which helps protect old growth forests from being clear cut). For more information read about Sources of Indoor Air Pollution on the EPA site.





Posted by Christa Jaillet on 12/10/2015

Are you tired of spending so much money on things like furniture polish? Do you want to free your home from harmful chemicals? You can be frugal and live green by making your own furniture polish. Here are three recipes for making your own homemade furniture polish: Recipe I Ingredients: 1 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice 1 tablespoon boiled linseed oil 1 tablespoon turpentine 1. Combine the ingredients in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid and shake until blended. 2. Dampen a cloth with cold water and wring it out until it's dry. 3. Saturate the cloth with the mixture and apply sparingly to a small area at a time. 4. Let dry for about 30 minutes, then polish with a soft cloth. This mixture gets gummy as it sits, so make just enough for one day's work.   Recipe II Ingredients: White vinegar   Lemon juice 1. Combine equal parts white vinegar and lemon juice in a bowl or spray bottle. 2. Use a clean cloth to rub a small amount of the polish into your furniture. 3. Wipe dry with another cloth.   Recipe III Ingredients: 1 cup olive oil 1/2 cup lemon juice 1. Combine olive oil and lemon juice in a bowl or spray bottle. 2. Use a clean cloth to rub a small amount of the polish into your furniture. 3. Wipe dry with another cloth.  





Posted by Christa Jaillet on 7/30/2015

Have you ever tried to clean your rugs? It can expensive and difficult to get the stains out. It can also be dangerous for small children and pets to put harmful chemicals on your rugs. Here is a recipe for a homemade rug cleaner that works great and is safe for your family: Ingredients: 1/4 teaspoon dishwashing liquid 1 cup lukewarm water 1. Combine the dishwashing liquid and water. 2. Use a spray bottle to apply the solution over a large area, or use the solution to spot-clean nongreasy stains. Don't use substitute laundry detergent or dishwasher detergent in place of dishwashing liquid, as they may contain additives that can affect the rug's color.